Recently I have often wondered whether I am wasting my time.  I pursued higher degree for the sake of learning while my friends went on to make money.  I read fairy tales and poems, not guides to investment and shares.  I am not completely oblivious to money, of course.  I am aware that reading Tolkien to your children would not make their stomach full.  I do plan my budget, curse the near zero interest of savings in this country, and search around for better investments.  It is just that I am not continually thinking about it.  I sincerely believe that it is more important that I read Iliad before I die than that I make my first million before I am 30 (do you see the peril of reading too much Tolkien?).  Of course, one can always try to achieve both.  But my point is that one who appreciates Iliad and spends her morning pondering whether Hector is a hero or a fool is not likely to make a million before she is 30.  And one who likes money so much that she can figure out a way to make a million before 30 would more likely than not consider both the Trojans and the Greeks idiot for spending so much money (war costs a lot, you know) for a woman, or for their honour.

Hector portrayed by Eric Bana in the movie Troy (2004).

Well, I guess it all boils down to what we want to be at the end of our earthly life: what we want to be remembered for.  My quick answer is this: I want, like Lewis, Tolkien and Chesterton, to be remembered for my work, my faith, my clear outlook of life, my stands on the really essential things.  Not for my wealth.  To set an even higher goal, I want to be like St Francis, who seems to have been so madly in love with the Almighty.